A cup is relative (or how to cook brown butter chocolate chip cookies)

This is how it all started.

http://instagram.com/p/e1ECQNw-Kd/

(a glitch in WordPress? The instagram embed doesn’t work at all)

I should join the “We want European cooking measures next to American measures in recipes” Club if it exists somewhere. Whoever invented the cup I believe had the “drinking tea” purpose in mind. At least, that’s what I use it for.

Anyway, after listening to “this is how a cookies crumbles” in the video above, I thought to research a bit on the original recipe. Found it here. Didn’t seem too complicated. In the end, I had to adapt a bit in terms of ingredients. The butter didn’t specifically say it was not salted. Didn’t use coarse sea salt on top at all. The term “molasses” sounded so… whatever, that when I looked for the translation and saw what it was, I was like “no way that goes in my cookies!”. It had too much sugar in it already, the recipe.

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Before the oven

The greatest struggle with these Americans… is their measurement system. Oz? Is that a cream? Cup? What cup? How big? Coffee cup? Tea cup? Why can’t you just write NUMBERS, huh? I’m a more down to earth person, I don’t need to interpret what a cup means! Not to mention I have cooking sprees that are more rare than snow in March. So when I see all those words instead of proper quantities, I’m inclined not to start at all. So why not help a lazy chef-to-be and “translate” all those cups into grams? And don’t even get me started on the inches! (leave 2 inches between the cookies – luckily I had used 2 inches the week before and knew it translates into 5 centimeters; even so, some stuck to one another in the oven – maybe 2 inches is relative too *sigh*).

Talking about relative things… 350 Fahrenheit is 180 Celsius. 12-14 minutes is more likely towards 20. At least that was my case. Maybe I left them too much to bake, given that some of them got a bit burned on the bottom. My cookies turned out bigger in the first tray (scoop dough by the two tablespoonful – really? I used an ice-cream spoon and it was too much; my advice, if you want the cookies to be small, is to use 1 teaspoonful). And I think they were more than 24 in the end. :D I don’t trust toothpicks in this case, so I had to crack one or two open, to look on the inside dough.

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After the oven

The taste? Crunchy and sweet. Not to mention the smell. By the way… Did you know that if you let butter melt long enough in the pan, it turns brown and clears at the same time? And I think that this lovely smell comes from that brown butter. After all, they are called brown butter chocolate chip cookies.¬†At least the smell is not relative.

Mum asked for more. And that’s the standard I want to reach every time. Happy cooking!

 

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